U.S. Troops Who Died in Iraq (Astral Plane)

AC 244: March 9, 2005 (Boston)

I awoke from this adventure in consciousness at 1:30 A.M., having slept for just an hour. I was in the Afterdeath Zone. I seemed to be searching for someone, but I never found him or her.

I was walking through long barrack-like rooms with low arched ceilings and muted recessed lighting. The length of both walls was lined with uniform single beds filled with sleeping people, mostly men. They were all on their backs with a white sheet and dun-colored blanket pulled up to their necks. No one stirred.

The atmosphere was like that of an army hospital. It made me think of what I read in Walt Whitman’s Specimen Days about his work with the wounded and dying during the Civil War.

The rooms went on and on, all silent, all filled with the dead. This was apparently a Holding Zone.

I was reminded of the time I saw a new hospital-like area under construction in preparation for receiving Iraqi dead during the Gulf War. But these troops were our own.

There was a gentle yet persistent pressure in the rooms that I recognized from previous visits to the Immigration Zone--the pressure to acknowledge that one is dead, so that one can move on to other zones of the Afterlife, in order to review one’s past life and prepare for reincarnation. The deeper I went into this zone, the stronger the pressure became, until I could stand it no longer and had to wake up.

Of course there was no need for me to recognize that I was dead. But the creepiness of the place was enhanced by this subtle pressure, like an insistent voice whispering “You’re dead, you’re dead.”

I don’t know how many troops have been lost in Iraq, but I think the number is around 1500. Perhaps I visited these troops in the Afterlife, where they’re being held. I have no idea why I would have done so. I don’t know anyone who’s over there and haven’t read anything lately about the number of dead.